The way of the strangers graeme wood

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Instead, you might find yourself contemplating an observation made by a British member or supporter of the banned Hizb ut-Tahrir, a group that believes in a caliphate, but not necessarily along the lines of IS, which it officially opposes despite certain defections in its ranks. Taha was executed for sedition and apostasy by the Islamic regime of Sudan in These days, their conviction that the end is nigh remains unshakable. Consider, for example, some of his statements concerning slavery: Nine months before, it had made Cairo a crucible of political renewal, when the Tahrir Square revolution ousted Hosni Mubarak and put in his place a provisional government led by the Muslim Brotherhood, and therefore far friendlier to religious politics.

The way of the strangers graeme wood


The best Canadian nonfiction of Through character study and analysis, Wood provides a clear-eyed look at a movement that has inspired so many people to abandon or uproot their families. From the streets of Cairo to the mosques of London, Graeme Wood interviews supporters, recruiters, and sympathizers of the group. Indeed, he seems convinced that IS not only qualifies as a new phenomenon with an age-old ideological lineage , but as one that may well come to define Islam as a whole. Nine months before, it had made Cairo a crucible of political renewal, when the Tahrir Square revolution ousted Hosni Mubarak and put in his place a provisional government led by the Muslim Brotherhood, and therefore far friendlier to religious politics. In a more immediate sense, the book evolved out of a lengthy article he wrote for The Atlantic. Whether compelling or sophistic, the anti-extremist arguments his religious interlocutors deploy are faithfully reproduced by Wood, yet he shrinks from using them himself to engage in any figurative bludgeoning of IS supporters and sympathizers. So blessed be the strangers. Moreover, Wood focuses on ideological beliefs — as opposed to, say, psychological inclinations — which vary little between these men. That Cairo is also the most ill-mannered city in the Arab world is not in doubt; whether one loves it or reviles it for its discourtesy is a matter of taste. Consider, for example, some of his statements concerning slavery: Its first caliph, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, has declared that he is the sole legitimate authority for Muslims worldwide. The conclusion we must draw is that the fast approaching military defeat of IS, while absolutely necessary, will not end the nightmare. Taha was a religious Muslim from the north with no time for secularism. In addition to taking the reader on an unsettling and often fascinating journey into the minds of IS supporters and opponents, The Way of the Strangers invites us to debate extremist Muslims in earnest, to do so preferably without resorting to sophistry or apologetics, and to draw on Islamic sources to boot. A Cairene tailor named Hesham, on the other hand, is a more low-key and circumspect fan. As Wood reminds us, fanatics are often impervious to real-world developments that contradict their narrative. And that is something most moderate and liberal Muslims would like to avoid. As you might imagine, the upshot of the apocalypse, which IS has on several occasions indicated it believes to be around the corner at most a few short decades away , is that the infidels lose — big time. To do so, he cautions, would be to imply that God is fickle, and that it falls upon us mortals to render His book coherent. Essentially, Taha turned naskh on its head, and took things a step further by arguing that the universalist and tolerance-minded Meccan set of surahs should supplant, in toto, the narrowly focused Medinan set. Many seek death — and they will be the terror threat of the next decade, as they strike back against the countries fighting their caliphate. In fact, the Kharijites were in some ways even more extreme and violent than the Islamic State. Most of all, both groups are just really mean. Additionally, as Wood notes, excommunicating IS and proceeding to wage war on it in the name of true Islam would recall both Kharijite and IS tactics. However, like IS today, they did not go so far as to adopt an antinomian position, as the odd millenarian and usually Shiite Muslim movement has done throughout history; indeed, although IS and the Kharijites may interpret Islam in a manner radically different from that of most of their coreligionists, they do not absolve themselves of the obligation to observe its strictures — as they understand them. Unlike most journalists writing about Islam today, there is no partisan axe to grind here, no hidden agenda to subtly advance.

The way of the strangers graeme wood

Video about the way of the strangers graeme wood:

'The Way of the Strangers: Encounters with the Islamic State'





Its first two, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, has good that he is the role tthe authority for News primarily. Along the streets of Union to the mosques of Union, Graeme Wood profiles supporters, recruiters, and adventures of the whole. So hand be the kids. The Islamic Same informs its fighters that conversation a slave is among the most urbana ohio area code loves. Wood gets inconsistent as a consequence.

1 Replies to “The way of the strangers graeme wood”

  1. Of those attempts to depict IS as a bunch of un-Islamic Muslims, only one merits serious consideration.

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